March 25-29 2012, The Week in a Nutshell, Primary

 

Ms. Weber will only be with me for a month, and had a great 10 week teaching between January and the beginning of March, so she jumped right in with both feet this week.

Primary

I wish that I had a big enough room to set up my mallet instruments and leave them up year round, but I don’t.  Earlier this year we had them out for a month or so for the intermediate students, but the primaries haven’t had an opportunity to play yet.  Rebecca set up the stage with enough mallet and classroom instruments for each student to be playing something at all times. She set them up in a circle, and rotated the  kids around the circle so that they got to play several instruments during the class period.

Ms. Weber’s set up at school #1

Ms. Weber’s set up at school #2

Her first step was to make sure that they could read the chart that she wanted them to work on. Since the instruments were set up out on the stage, which adjoins our room,  she was able to review “Rain Rain, Go Away” with the students at their seats.  She began with the rhythm, then added Mi, Sol, and La.  She did not tell the students what they were singing ahead of time, so in effect, she was giving them a mystery tune.  They sang and listened, then identified the song with no trouble.

Rain Rain, Go Away

Her next step was to teach about the mallets and instruments themselves.  She showed them a mallet, named it, and explained that its use is to play instruments with bars.  Sounds overly simple, but the fact is, that many first graders don’t know the term “mallet”, and need the explanation.  Then she explained that a xylophone is an instrument with wooden bars.  “What kind of bars do xylophones have”?

“Wooden!” they exclaimed.

“The biggest xylophone is called the bass.  So, when I say ‘big’ you say bass”.

“Big”

“Bass”, they answered.

“Big”

“Bass”

“When I say bass, you say big.  Bass”.

“Big”

“Bass”

“Big”

This was a very quick exchange, but solidified the concept in their little brains, so that later, when she showed them the biggest xylophones and asked which ones they thought they were, the immediately responded “Bass!”

” The medium sized xylophones are called alto. So when I say medium, you say alto.  Medium”.

“Alto”

“Medium”

“Alto”.

“When I say alto, you say medium.  Alto”.

” Medium”

“Alto”

“Medium”.

She carried this on down to the sopranos.

” When I say small, you say soprano.  Small”.

“Soprano”

“Small”

“Soprano”

“When I say soprano, you say small.  Soprano”.

“Small”

“Soprano”

“Small”.

“Some instruments have metal bars.  These are called metallophones.  What kind bars do metallophones have?”

” Metal bars!”

“What kind of bars do xylophones have?”

“Wooden bars!”

Once all of this was covered Ms. Weber lined them up and led them out to the stage.  They’d been instructed not to touch anything until told, the penalty for doing so being a check mark.  3 checks would mean having to sit out and not play.  (There was not a single child all week who had to sit out).  Once every student was seated at an instrument, Ms. Weber showed them how to hold the mallet, ( pinch, wrap, turn, as if holding onto handlebars on your bike),

Pinch, Wrap, Turn

and then how to bounce it in the middle of the bar.  They spent a moment bouncing their mallets on the bars, and she then quickly explained what each of the classroom instruments is, and demonstrated how to play it.  Everyone practiced playing a steady beat on whatever instrument was in front of them.  Almost without fail they rushed the beat, so when this happened, she made them watch her feet and only play when she took a step.  She took a couple of slow steps, then several more, then gradually sped up until the kids were playing HER steady beat.  Then she had the students stand up and rotate around the circle to the next instrument.  The entire process was repeated 4 or 5 times.

That much took up her entire 45 minutes, so she saved the rest of the lesson for the next cycle  of classes, which began on Friday.  This cycle will take us through Wednesday of next week, when we close for 5 days for the Easter holiday.

Before going out onto the stage this time, she had the students use their hands as if they were holding mallets, to the tune of “Rain Rain”.

R L RR L

RRRRRR L

Then she had them do this with their feet.  (She called it the “Ms. Weber Shuffle”, and they loved it!  )

Once out on the stage she reviewed everything they’d done previously through several rotations, and then asked them to play the rhythm of “Rain Rain, Go Away” on G.  (She removed all bars except E, G and A).  Classroom instruments played along as well.  Rotate.  Once everyone had the opportunity to play the rhythm on G, she reviewed R L RR L and had them apply it to playing G E GG E.  Some are coordinated enough to do this straight off, but others really struggled.  As soon as possible she had the classroom instruments play along, then everyone moved over to the next instrument.  She continued to follow this procedure, until they were able to play all of “Rain Rain, Go Away”.  Finally, she had the classroom instruments play the steady beat, while the mallet instruments played the melody.

A successful first week for Ms. Weber!

Jane Rivera, march 29, 2012, All Rights Reserved

January 30-February 3, The Week in a Nutshell; Primary

I didn’t post my primary lessons last week….time just gets away from me!  So, I’ll cover a few extra things this week.

Grade 1

Last week I introduced “Skinnamarink” to first grade by playing the recording from “Share the Music”, Grade 2, and then teaching the song by rote. (I also reviewed it with second grade, who learned it last year.)

Once they know the song I have them sing along with the recording while I play a steady beat game.  I keep the beat by pointing at a different student on each beat.   Whenever the phrase stops, my finger stops and points at whoever it was on at the end of the phrase.  (The implication being ” I love YOU”,  “Yes, I DO”, etc.)It is so touching to me that they are genuinely pleased when the beat stops on them.  Everyone needs to be told that they’re loved.  The song plays through 3 times, so I have plenty of opportunities to love various students.  Then I tell them that it’s their turn to keep the steady beat.  (Great assessment  song; you can watch for 3 verses).  Again, I am amazed at how little embarrassment there is, and how much pleasure at telling each other they “love” them.  I always do this a few weeks before Valentine’s day, and I mention it now because I reviewed it with them at the end of this week’s lesson.

We’re continuing to work on sol-mi.  Last week we worked on “Fuzzy Wuzzy was a Bear, which  utilizes mi-sol.  Before we reviewed it this week I read them So-Me book #3, which also introduces reading the interval “backwards”…starting on mi instead of sol.  (“So-Me, Oh, and Romeo”.  The books are available from MusicPlay).  The kids love these little stories.  Every time So-Me’s name occurs I sing it to the kids, along with all of the other patterns of mi, sol and la that are incorporated into the stories.  A cd comes with the books, but I prefer to read them myself.

So Me....Oh and Romeo

So Me....Oh and Romeo

Our new chart this week is “Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, Turn Around”.

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, Turn Around

We learn the rhythm on doo, (quarter notes), and doo-day, (eighth notes). We speak it, speak it and clap it, and clap it while thinking it silently in our heads.  We practice singing “Sol is higher, Mi is lower” several times with the correlating hand signals, the read the S’s and M’s underneath the rhythm.  Where there is no letter, the students speak the rhythm syllables.

I sing them the tune using a book by the same name, by Steve Scott.  ISBN 0-694-01162-2.

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear

The melody is:

SS M SS M S L S M

SS M SS M S M R Z

SS M SS M S L S M

SS M SS M S M D Z

(Z = rest).

Finally, I teach simultaneously the following words and corresponding movements:

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, turn around,

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, touch the ground.

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, tie your shoes.  (Pretend to tie shoes.)

Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear, that will do.  (Shake finger.)

I teach this to them s l o w l y.  We repeat the song numerous times, each time a little faster.  I use the keyboard to control the tempo, using the chords C and G.  By about the third time through they begin to understand what’s happening, and the smiles start to appear.  We keep going until we’re singing and moving as fast as we possibly can.  Seems like such a simple, silly thing to do, but it’s little things like this that make music class fun.  Yesterday, when we were sitting back down on the rug I hear one tiny girl say, “I love Teddy Bear, Teddy Bear”.  Made me smile.   By the way, just about the entire lesson this week happened with the kids on the rug in front of my chair.  I had a lot of things I wanted them to be able to see.

Since last week was about the bear “Fuzzy Wuzzy”, I’d brought out the book, “The Teddy Bears’ Picnic.  This week was about Teddy Bear, so I brought out “Jenny Jenkins” performed by the same bears: Jerry Garcia and Dave Grisman.  ISBN 0-06-028263-0, Bruce Whatley, illustrator.

What Wll You Wear, Jenny Jenkins?

I go through the book, singing the song, asking what color we will sing about next, noting details in the illustrations, (like how cute Jenny looks in her beige robe and slippers, or “I bet that banana peel on the ground will have consequences on the next page.”)  By the time I play the recording, (and go through the book again), they’ve got the tune, the pattern of the words and just need a little help with “roldy-poldy-tildy-toldy-seeka-double-use a cozza.”  There is one more book in this series, which I will use next week:  “There Ain’t No Bugs on Me.”  After that, all of the books on this page except for the So-Me book will be for sale.

We finished up this week with Skinnamarink, as I mentioned at the beginning of the post.

So, in this lesson we did:  solfege, rhythm and tone reading, singing, movement, and 3 children’s books.

Grade 2

A while back I taught a chart called “Valentine, but only used the solfege syllables as words.  Here’s a re-cap of that lesson.

“Here’s how the song actually goes:

Mi Sol Do

But this is all the kids ever see. I teach “Swinging” and “Round we go” by rote.

Once they can sing the whole thing, they stand and face a partner. “Mi” is a patsch on their lap, “sol” is clap their own hands once, “do” is two fists, hands at sides. “Swinging, swinging to and fro” take partner’s hands and swing from side to side. (Gently….always tell them, gently.) Mi sol do as the first time. “Round and round and round we go”, take partners hands and walk in a circle. (Slowly…always tell them slowly.) We do the dance several times. If they’re a particularly mature group I might start slowly and speed up each time.”

 That was back in October, so you can see why I didn’t use the Valentine words at that time.  This week I reviewed what we did in the fall, and added the Valentine words.

Won'tcha be my Valentimes

Complete lyrics:

Valentine, Valentine, won’t you be my valentine?

Valentine, Valentine, yes, I’ll be your Valentine.

I’ll never forget the student who used to sing, “Valentimes, Valentimes, won’tcha be my Valentimes.”  I still smile when I think of him.

So, now we have 2 verses for the clapping game, which we DO start slowly and speed up.  Why do they find that so enjoyable?  Don’t know, but I run with it.

You may recall that we’ve been adding “la” to our do-mi-sol reading, so in addition to reviewing “Valentine” we also worked on “Little Snail.”  All quarter notes and quarter rests, again, the Z = a rest.

S S M M S S M Z      Little Snail I cannot see

S S L L S S M Z         Why you always hide from me.

D M S S L L M Z      Little Snail oh don’t be shy.

D M S S L L M Z      I won’t hurt you, no not I.

S S M M S S M Z      Little Snail I cannot see

S S L L S S M Z         Why you always hide from me.

The rhythm is so easy that we go directly to the melody, singing from a chart with the rhythm stems with the letter for Do, Mi, Sol or La underneath.  (Sorry…I forgot to take a picture.) It’s an easy song to learn and remember, so once they have it down I have them line up behind me, and hold the hand of the person in front of them.  Then, as they sing, I start to turn in a circle, right in my personal space.  This has the effect  of winding them all tightly around me, turning us into a snail.  I have the last person lead us out of the snail as we sing the song one more time.  Caution:  tell the students they may not run, push or pull, or someone will fall and get hurt.

I sang them a book, The Ballad of Valentine, by Alison Jackson, ISBN 0-525-46720-3,  stopping for vocabulary and terms that they might not, (and most did not) understand: Morse Code, Smoke Signals, Homing Pigeon.  It’s a silly song to the tune of Clementine, about all of the different ways this guy tries send a message to ask Valentine to be his valentine. It also gave me a way to explain to them what a ballad is.  That will come up again as the year goes on.  (Think  “Senior Don Gato” and “The Cat Came Back.”)

The Ballad of Valentine

We finished up with Skinnamarink and the steady beat game.  Always a hit.

Wow, I’ve been sitting here writing for an hour and a half, and I still have intermediates to go.  It always amazes me how much stuff we do in a week.  Stay tuned.

:0)

J.

Jan. 3-6: The Week in a Nutshell, Primaries

The kids were subdued on Tuesday, our first day back from our Christmas break, but by Friday they were back to themselves, full of energy.

First Grade

In first grade we are about to begin adding pitches to our note reading skills. First though, I went back through some of the things we learned during the first half of the year, just to make sure they’re solid. I will copy and paste the original post for each activity.

Steady beat, and reading left to right:
We reviewed “A Sailor Went to Sea”.

Grade 1 worked on “A Sailor Went to Sea,” still a steady beat song, but since the beat is also the rhythm of the song we’re preparing to venture into rhythm territory.

l l l l l l l l
A sailor went to sea sea sea
s d s l s m s s

l l l l l l l l
To see what he could see see see
s d s l t d d d

l l l l l l l l
And all that he could see see see
s d s l s m s s

l l l l l l l l
Was wa ter in the sea sea sea.
s l l t t d d d

A slightly different version of the song can be found in MusicPlay, grade 2.

We keep the steady beat as usual by speaking the syllable “doo” each time I touch one of the beat lines.
Next we add 1 clap for each doo. Finally, they clap and doo while I sing the song to them.

I teach the words and melody by rote. Every time we sing “sea” or “see” we touch our foreheads in a little salute, always on the beast.

Verse 2: A sailor went to chop chop chop. Karate chop your own arm.
Verse 3: A sailor went to knee knee knee. Karate chop your own knee.
Verse 4: A sailor went to tap tap tap. Tap feet.
Verse 5. A sailor went to oo-wash-ee-wash. Twist around like you’re a washing machine.

Then do the whole song over again without stopping between verses.

Remember, what you see above was the original lesson, and took a lot longer than the review we did this week.

Next we added in the quarter rest, reviewing “Up and Down, ‘ Round the Town.”. Of course, we don’t just review the quarter notes and rests….we must play the game!

Up and Down, ‘Round the Town” is sung to the tune of “Sur le Pont d’Avignon”.

D D D rest, R R R rest

M F S D T1 D R S1

D D D rest, R R R rest

M F S D R  T1 D rest

We use the Gordon syllables in our district, so I would have the kids read aloud, saying,

Doo Doo Doo   (sh)   Doo Doo Doo   (sh)

Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo

Doo Doo Doo   (sh)   Doo Doo Doo   (sh)

Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo   (sh)

You may have the kids using ta’s instead.  As soon as possible I try to have them eliminate the “sh”, either pulling their hands apart in silence, or putting a hand over their mouth, since a rest is supposed to be silent.

There is a game that goes with this little song.  I tell the students to pretend that they are in our town on a Saturday…maybe they go to the library, the supermarket, the gas station….but everywhere they go, they keep running into people from our class.  By this time they know what a greeting is, so I have them silently greet the person next to them.  They could shake hands, smile, wave, bow or gently hug.  The game is to sing and walk around “town” (the music room), greeting each other in any way that is not rough and does not prevent them from singing.  The rules are  that they must keep singing, no running, no rough stuff, and no going where they cannot be seen. (Behind the piano, under chairs etc.  Believe me, this  needs to spelled out.)  At the end of the song they must freeze, and listen for further directions from me:

“Gentlemen, take a bow.”

DD D                 D   D  R-D

“Ladies, take a curtsie.”

DD D                 D   D  R-D

(You might have to teach them what a curtsie is.)

We then do our best singing, and start again.  Other directions for them to follow after the freeze could include touch your toes, reach for the ceiling, turn in a circle, flap your wings, clap your hands, snap your fingers, stand on one foot, hope up and down, etc.  The final directions are:

“Gentlemen, sit down on the rug.”

DD D                 D   D  R-D

“Ladies, sit down on the rug.”

DD D                 D   D  R-D

Our third review chart is “Are You Sleeping”, adding in pairs of eighth notes.

I show them what eighth notes look like before we begin the reading/echoing. (Feierabend advocates echoing before doing anything else, because just as children learn to talk before they can read, we learn to hear rhythms and associate them with their symbols by hearing and seeing someone else perform them.) Following that, I make sure that they understand what an echo does….it repeats the original sound exactly. I explain that my part is to the left, but when we cross over the line, they take over by echoing exactly what they heard. I point to every symbol…quarters, rests and eighths. After reading, we read and clap. Then I sing the melody on the rhythm syllables, and they echo back…still pointing all the while. All that’s left to do until next time is to add the words. Next time, after reviewing, I’ll ask them to be the leader so I can be the echo. Since the melody is the same, I paint 2 little face on my thumbs and sing “Where is Thumbkin” with them….at this early stage of first grade, I can still get away with it. :0)

Are You Sleeping

Finally, eighths and quarters, sung to the tune of “BINGO”.

I showed them a chart with the rhythm notation for BINGO, and had them read it without telling them what it was.

( TT = eighth notes, l = quarter notes).

TT TT TT TT

TT TT l l

l l TT l

l l TT l

l l TT TT

TT TT l l

We spoke it on doo’s and dooday’s, spoke it and clapped it, and then I sang it for them using the rhythm syllables instead of the words. (Melodic recognition). They recognized it somewhere in the second phrase. We then sang it all together using the rhythm syllables before adding the familiar words and clapping sequences. I add on a little twist….I tell them that the farmer had a duck whose name is D-A-F-F-Y. They decode the spelling pretty quickly and we sing the verse. He also had a pig named P-O-R-K-Y, a cat named T-A-B-B-Y, and a snake named H-I-S-S-Y. finally, I tell them that once a teacher had a kid, and his name was T-Y-L-E-R, (or Molly, or Jacob or any other 5 letter name of a student in the class). Once I tell them that the trick is to use a name with 5 letters they all start counting on their fingers, and then, of course, we must do every student in the room whose name has 5 letters. (But that’s ok).

All that, so I could say to them, “And now, here is something new.”

The chart I showed them is called “Sound Maps.” All they have to do is make their voice follow my finger as it travels up and down the maps. The app I’m using is called is called “Singing Fingers”. I show each map upside down and right side up. Above the pictures is a link to the YouTube demo of the Singing Fingers App.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iCYA7N-vdZA

Map 1

Map 2

Map 3

The last thing I did with the first graders this week, aside from a quick listen to “The Surprise Symphony”, is to read to the “So-me and the Spider.” This is from a series of 12 books using sol-mi, la-mi and sol-la-mi. (Three siblings.) The series is available from MusicPlay, Denise Gagne’s company in Canada.
http://www.musicplay.ca/

Second Grade

I teach in 2 buildings on a 4 day cycle. One of my buildings is mine completely, and I am there 3 days out of 4. The other building is shared with a colleague, and each of us is there 1 day apiece. The smaller school did their second grade program in December, and will now be playing catch up for a few weeks. The larger school is now beginning to learn the music for their program. I’m not sure exactly how I’m going to put it together just yet, but I’ve decided to use Muppet Music. The reader’s Digest Children’s Songbook has a lot of the songs I’m going to use, including, “The Muppet Show”, “The Rainbow Connection”, “Sing”, “Rubber Duckie” and “It’s Not Easy Being Green.” I was able to purchase karaoke tracks for 3 of them. I play piano pretty well, so if necessary I can accompany them myself, and the book has complete piano/vocal scores. Another option may be “Sing Along With Ernie” while I project a YouTube video of “Rubber Duckie”…but first I have to find out if that’s legal. (If anyone knows, please comment.)

ISBN 0-89577-214-0

We started with “The Muppet Show Theme”, which is short and sweet, so we had plenty of time to review our Curwen hand signals for do-mi-sol. I then used the hand signals to teach them “The Lady With the Alligator Purse.”

Mother, Mother I am sick.
s m s m s m s

Send for the doctor quick, quick quick.
s m m s m s s d

the rest of the verses are:

In came the doctor, in came the nurse.
In came the lady with the alligator purse.

I don’t want the doctor, I don’t want the nurse.
I don’t want the lady with the alligator purse.

Out went the doctor, out went the nurse.
Out went the lady with the alligator purse.

Once they know the song, which doesn’t take them long, we sit in a circle and dramatize it. The sick person and his mother are in the middle, the doctor, nurse and lady with the alligator purse are outside the circle. When we sing the first verse, mother pretends to dial the phone and then goes to the “door” to let the visitors in. On verse 2 the doctor kneels by the patient’s head, the nurse in the middle and the lady with the alligator purse at the feet. Now we take a break in the song, while the doctor feels the patient’s forehead or listens for a heartbeat or checks reflexes. there’s always something wrong, so the doctor asks the nurse for a biiiiiiiiig needle. She doesn’t have one, so she asks the lady with the alligator purse if she happens to have one. the lady roots around in her imaginary purse and takes out a huge imaginary needle, which she passes to the nurse, who passes it to the doctor, who gives the patient a shot. (AAAAAhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!) So of course the patient sings verse 3, and the visitors exit the circle on verse 4. It’s so simple and short, but they love it, and we have to do it until everyone has had a turn to be one of the characters.

I have more to tell you….but this post is quite long enough. I’ll be posting my Tchaikovsky assessment for intermediate students shortly, as well as a link to an animation on our new composer, Franz Joseph Haydn.

Thanks for reading all of this! :0)

The Week In a Nutshell, Friday Sept. 30, 2011, Primary

In first and second grades this week, each grade had their own literacy lesson, and then both learned the same song.

Grade 1 worked on “A Sailor Went to Sea,” still a steady beat song, but since the beat is also the rhythm of the song we’re preparing to venture into rhythm territory.

l l l l l l l l
A sailor went to sea sea sea
s d s l s m s s

l l l l l l l l
To see what he could see see see
s d s l t d d d

l l l l l l l l
And all that he could see see see
s d s l s m s s

l l l l l l l l
Was wa ter in the sea sea sea.
s l l t t d d d

A slightly different version of the song can be found in MusicPlay, grade 2.

We keep the steady beat as usual by speaking the syllable “doo” each time I touch one of the beat lines.
Next we add 1 clap for each doo. Finally, they clap and doo while I sing the song to them.

I teach the words and melody by rote. Every time we sing “sea” or “see” we touch our foreheads in a little salute, always on the beast.

Verse 2: A sailor went to chop chop chop. Karate chop your own arm.
Verse 3: A sailor went to knee knee knee. Karate chop your own knee.
Verse 4: A sailor went to tap tap tap. Tap feet.
Verse 5. A sailor went to oo-wash-ee-wash. Twist around like you’re a washing machine.

Then do the whole song over again without stopping between verses.

Grade 2: This week I introduce “do” to second grade. Our warm ups already include the pattern
“do mi sol mi do.”

Memo

(Check the category “Warm ups” for more warm up recordings.)

Because they are familiar with the pattern, it’s easy to introduce the handsign for do, and the “sol mi do” pattern used in the song “Ten in the Bed.” I sing them the song, and have them sing “sol mi do. Sol mi do,” every time we come to that pattern. (I signal them with the hand sign for sol mi do.) After we’ve gone through that 10 times, (ah the power of repetition), I tell them the real words and we sing the song as we look at one of the books.
“There were 10 in the bed and the little one said, roll over. roll over.
So they all rolled over and one fell out…
There were 9 etc.”

The song is notated in the back of “Roll Over” by Merle Peek. isbn 0-395-58105-2

Ten in a Bed

Ten Bears in a Bed, Roll Over

The song that both grades learned is “The Noble Duke of York/ A Hunting We Will Go.” A slightly different version , “The Grand Old Duke of York” can be found in MusicPlay, grade 2. I play the song on my guitar, and have the kids stand every time they hear the word up, sit every time they hear the word down, and stand half way up when the hear the words “half way up.”

Oh the noble Duke of York
m r d d d d d

He had ten thousand men.
d r r r r r

He led them up to the top of the hill
r m m m m m f f f f

Then he led them down again.
f f m m r r d

And when they were up they were up.
d d d d d d d d

And when they were down they were down.
d r r r r r r r

But when they were only half way up
r m m m m m f f f

They were neither up nor down.
f f m m r r d

I play it in D Major, using D, A and G.

We do this several times, each time getting a little faster. Then I ask them to try and sing the melody with me on la la la . Never a problem for them. Now I tell them, “The reason I wanted you to hear this song is because it has exactly the same tune as the song in this rhyming book.”

A Hunting We Will Go by John Langstaff

“A Hunting We Will Go” by John Langstaff, illustrated by Natalie Winslow Parker, isbn 0-689-50007-6.

At the bottom of each page is a picture of an animal. The first is a fox. I ask for as many rhyming words for fox as I can think of, then we turn the page to see which it is.

“Oh a hunting we will go.
A hunting we will go.
We’ll catch a fox and put him in a box
And then we’ll let him go.

Then repeat on la la la.

You don’t need the book to do this…just pick an animal and rhyme it. When we’ve finished the book that’s exactly what we do with class names. I start us off…”We’ll catch Hannah and give her a banana” e.g. I never have to do that more than twice before they’re off and running with it.

It’s FRIDAY!!! Have a great weekend!

:0)

Jane

Grade 1, Music Literacy Lesson #2.

Time to get started on a new lesson, I guess.  This is the second music literacy lesson for K/1.  They can be found in order in the category “Kindergarten/Grade 1.

The second time I see  my first graders, we’ll review the first warm up that we learned, then tackle a new one.  It’s pretty easy..you just sing what it says:

“do mi sol mi do.”  Begin in C Major, and go up by half steps until you get to B flat Major, then come back down again.

Listen: Memo

Following the warm ups we will review the term “phrase”, as well as the 3 short songs that we used to begin to understand its meaning.  (Please refer to  http://tuesdaymusic.wordpress.com/2011/07/12/music-literacy-lesson-1-grade-1/)

To continue learning about “phrase”, we make a circle to sing “The Bear Went Over the Mountain.”  We move the circle around, but each time we finish a phrase, we change directions.

“The bear went over the mountain” – switch

“The bear went over the mountain” – switch

“The bear went over the mountain to see what he could see” – stop

Everyone gets down on their knees, and props their chin up with their right hand, elbow on the floor.

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – stand up and join hands, move circle while singing the next phrase:

“Was the other side of the mountain” – switch

“The other side of the mountain” – switch

“The other side of the mountain was all that he could see.”

Everyone gets down on their knees, and props their chin up with their right hand, elbow on the floor.

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – stand up and join hands, move circle while singing the next phrase:

“Was the other side of the mountain” – switch

” The the other side of the mountain” – switch

” The other side of the mountain was all that he could see.-

Everyone gets down on their knees, and props their chin up with their right hand, elbow on the floor.

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” – switch hands

“And all that he could see” -

stand up and join hands, move circle while singing the next phrase:

“Was the other side of the mountain” – switch

” The the other side of the mountain” – switch

” The other side of the mountain was all that he could see.

It takes a little while for these young ones to learn, not just when to switch directions, but HOW to switch directions.  By the time you’ve finished it though, they should be getting the idea.

While we will continue to reinforce their understanding of “phrase”,  we can easily begin to incorporate “steady beat.”  I explain that a steady beat never speeds up or slows down…that’s why it’s called “steady.”  I give them some examples of things that keep a steady beat: their heart, windshield wipers, a clock.

Draw 4 sets of straight lines, (doo’s ) on the board.

I    I    I    I

I    I    I    I

I    I    I    I

I    I    I   I

Simply have the students say the word “doo” every time, and only every time you point to one of the lines. Keep the steady beat as you point thorough the lines.  The second time you go through the chart, have them give one clap every time they say “doo.”  The third time, keep pointing, and have them “doo” and clap while you sing “Yankee Doodle.”

“Boys and girls, you are doing this so well, I’d like to see if you can clap the steady beat while YOU sing “Yankee Doodle.”  Keep pointing to each beat as they sing and clap.  it really helps.  After practicing this several times, I bring out my book “Yankee Doodle.”

It’s by the same author as “Michael Finnegan” and, like that book, the entire thing can be sung to the kids.

“Yankee Doodle” by MaryAnn Hoberman and Nadine Bernard Westcott. ISBN 0-316-14551-3.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 575 other followers